Canning Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

Jars with Corned Beef Cabbage and Potatoes

Canning corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes was something I tried for the first-time last March and loved! One of the best things I like about canning is that you can buy seasonal items on sale from the grocery store, can them, and have them on your shelves to eat year-round. It saves money and it is a great way to have food that is ready to eat, in this case, a complete meal. Turkey during Thanksgiving and of course corned beef right before St. Patrick’s Day are good examples.

I stocked up on corned beef last March when it was on sale and canned some jars of just corned beef, plus some quart and pint jars of corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes. The simple recipe of canned corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes makes an easy meal, which is great to have on hand for busy weeknights.

Steps for Canning Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

  • Cut the corned beef into one-inch pieces and remove as much fat as possible.
  • Peel and cut potatoes into small pieces about one inch.
  • Cut up the cabbage into one-inch pieces.
  • Layer corned beef, potatoes and cabbage into jars.
  • Add spices.
  • Add boiling water to the jars.
  • Remove air bubbles, wipe rims, add lids.
  • Process 75 minutes for pints, 90 minutes for quarts in pressure canner.

Ingredients for Canning Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

Corned Beef – There are two different cuts of corned beef, flat cut and point cut. This is a good article that discusses the differences in the cuts. Either cut can be used in this recipe.

Cabbage – Green cabbage or purple cabbage can be used. The fresh cabbage cooks down during the pressure-cooking process so that it is not very evident in the final product.

Potatoes – Any kind of potatoes can be used, red potatoes, russet potatoes or whatever is preferred.

Spices – I used the spice packet included with the corned beef.

Water – Boiling water is added to fill the jar. Other options would be chicken broth or beef broth.

Other options – Other options to add would be baby carrots or large carrots cut up, yellow onion or red onion cut up, or diced onion. Other spices to add extra flavor could be pickling spice, black pepper, fresh thyme, fresh parsley, or bay leaves.

Detailed Steps for Canning Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

The first step is to cut the corned beef into one-inch pieces and remove as much fat as possible. Peel the potatoes and cut the potatoes up into small pieces. Cut up the head of the cabbage into smaller pieces. Add the corned beef, potatoes, and cabbage to the clean jars and add spices.

Corned beef, potatoes and cabbage in the canning jars
Corned beef, potatoes, cabbage and spices in pint jars

Add boiling water to each jar and leave one inch head space, remove the air bubbles, wipe the rims, and add the lids to the jars. Process in the pressure canner for 75 minutes for pints or 90 minutes for quarts. Remove the jars with a jar lifter when the canning is complete. Set the jars on a towel on the counter and do not disturb for 24 hours.

Canned corned beef, potatoes and cabbage
Canned corned beef, potatoes and cabbage

The Delicious Results

Enjoy the hearty meal of corned beef, potatoes, and cabbage any time with this ready to go meal. It actually makes a hearty soup to eat on a cold day or any time and would go great with some crusty bread.

Bowl of canned corned beef, potatoes and cabbage

Other Cooking Methods for Corned Beef, Potatoes and Cabbage

Corned beef, potatoes and cabbage is such a tasty dish and easy meal that should be eaten year-round and not just around St. Patrick’s Day. It can be cooked several different ways, on the stove top, in a slow cooker or an instant pot. My preferred cooking method is the instant pot as it is the easy way and avoids hours of cooking and the beef brisket turns out tender and juicy.

For more of my canning and other favorite recipes and other homestead-type activities, such as gardening and raising chickens, go to my website www.HawkPointHomestead.com. For updates, please follow my Facebook page at Hawk Point Hobby Homestead.

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Bowl of Canned Corned Beef, Cabbage and potatoes

Canned Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

Yield: Desired Amount
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 35 minutes

Canning corned beef, cabbage and potatoes, a complete and tasty meal in a jar

Ingredients

  • Corned Beef
  • Potatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Water
  • Spices

Instructions

  • Cut the corned beef into one-inch pieces and remove as much fat as possible.
  • Peel and cut potatoes into small pieces about one inch
  • Cut up the cabbage into one-inch pieces.
  • Layer corned beef, potatoes and cabbage into jars.
  • Add spices.
  • Add boiling water to the jars.
  • Remove air bubbles, wipe rims, and add lids.
  • Process 75 minutes for pints, or 90 minutes for quarts in a pressure canner.
  • 8 thoughts on “Canning Corned Beef, Cabbage and Potatoes

      1. No, it did not affect it at all. Funny, you ask that, I just posted an a recipe for canning potatoes today. I did soak and rinse those potatoes, but when I have canned beef stew and this recipe with potatoes, I did not notice the starch. If you are concerned, and I may do this in the future, you could soak and rinse the potatoes. Thanks for commenting!

      1. I am sorry, this is one recipe I did not measure out. I just listed the desired amount as the yield. I use a NESCO electric canner and can only process 4 quarts at a time. For my beef stew recipe, I used the following measurements for pints, 1 cup of meat, 1/2 cup of potatoes and carrots each. For canning quarts of the corned beef recipe, I would use 2 cups corned beef and 1 cup potatoes and 1 cup cabbage for each quart jar.

    1. I cooked my corn beef, cabbage, potatoes and carrots in my crockpot. Can I can the leftovers or will it get mushy?

      1. The vegetables probably would get mushy, but they are soft anyway, so you might try it and see how it turns out. When I can using fresh cabbage, the cabbage almost disappears, but still tastes good!

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